Tag Archives: thoughts

The Saga Continues…

Life is always a long story (or at least one would hope!)
No discontented ramblings here…

“The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.”

Harvest_Mouse_(face)

Today I am both, mouse and man, as referred to in the poem.
My family’s plan to move is subject to constant revision.

Weekly Writing Challenge: Fifty | The Daily Post

Continue reading The Saga Continues…

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One Word Photo Challenge: Brown (The End of the Road)

I love all things interesting and unusual. This tree caught my eye on a summer camping trip to Burlingame State Park. I’ve never seen a tree grow over a sign like this before. What a peaceful place on the campground. Nature envelops every trace of humanity. Even the sign bows to the beauty of creation.

State Property Ends
State Property Ends

and another sight that caught my eye…

Continue reading One Word Photo Challenge: Brown (The End of the Road)

Not Giving Up

It’s something I struggle with. Something worthwhile for everyone. It’s advice that’s easy to give but much harder to take (Isn’t all advice that way?)

So why would I give up on myself – even though I’ve never really given up on anyone else? Even when I’ve lost all strength, I pray. Even when it seems like I just don’t care, silently I pray. We all fall short. I’m painfully aware of my own failings in life.

It may not always be the prayers of my youth, or formal prayers. (There is a time and place for everything.) Some days it’s just a positive thought I send your way. Some days when the pain is too great, and I can’t find my own words, it’s more of a chant or a meditation. Sometimes it’s long and repetitive like the Litany of the Saints. Some days it’s short and sweet.

Some days it’s a quiet walk enjoying nature, that renews my strength.

IMG_3353 scaled

Why then do I give up so easily on myself?

It’s a question worthy of asking…

Continue reading Not Giving Up

Waiting for the Golden Years

This last month has been one of the most hectic times in my life. I keep waiting for things to settle down. I’ve had the stomach bug for 3 days now. I suppose it’s time to see a doctor, but all I really want to do is rest.

When will the golden years come? All my life I’ve heard people say it will get easier when you’re older. I’m not sure that it ever gets easier. I know my perspective has changed so much over the years. Things that were once the end of the world are now just speed bumps.

Wednesday afternoon we drove through a snow storm on our way home from moving our daughter and grandson out-of-state. I was looking forward to getting home and taking a few hours to rest before getting back to work.

Continue reading Waiting for the Golden Years

One Word Photo Challenge: Purple (Winter Sunset)

This week I’m posting a photo collage in response to: One Word Photo Challenge: Purple | Jennifer Nichole Wells  The first thing that came to mind when I read this week’s photo challenge wasn’t a picture I had taken but rather an image in my mind…

Continue reading One Word Photo Challenge: Purple (Winter Sunset)

When “Normal” was Normal

Lately, I find myself trying to remember what normal was like. What exactly is normal anyway? I’m not sure I’ve ever really known “normal” but there was a time before I had a child with autism and special needs. It seems so long ago now, like a distant memory…

I recently restored old photos from a backup drive. I’m glad to have the old photos back within reach because I honestly can’t remember if everything was “normal” in the beginning. I had started to wonder if I had missed the signs of what was yet to come…  So I sit here looking at old photos and examining them for something I could have missed or something I’ve forgotten.

Stephen had the cord wrapped around his neck at birth. I don’t remember him being blue for long, but then I wondered…

I held him for a brief moment before they cut off the end of the cord...
I held him for a brief moment before they cut off the end of the cord…

Stephen was diagnosed with Infantile Spasms at 5 months old. I’ve heard that having the cord wrapped around the neck at birth is common in babies who have Infantile Spasms – especially when the exact cause is unknown.

I remember he cried right away when he was born. He started to get pink right away and they cleaned him up and next dad cut the cord...
I remember he cried right away when he was born; he started to get pink . They cleaned him up and then dad cut the cord…

 Infantile spasms is associated with a significant risk of mortality and morbidity. Riikonen has followed 214 infantile spasms patients for 20–35 years and has accumulated the best long-term follow-up studies of these patients. In her series, nearly one third of the patients died during the follow-up period, many in the first 3 years of life. Eight of the 24 patients who died by age 3 died of complications of therapy with ACTH…

I was induced at 9:00 am and Stephen was born by 6:00 pm. Here he is looking like a normal healthy newborn in his brother's arms.
I was induced at 9:00 am and Stephen was born by 6:00 pm. Here he is looking like a normal healthy newborn in his brother’s arms an hour later…

Without even realizing it we had a vision of what life would be like…

We could never have imagined what life had in store for us…

This was just the beginning of our story

Stephen is now 7 years old. His diagnosis includes: autism, epilepsy, GI disorders (gastrointestinal), hearing impairment, vision impairment, and neuro developmental delays. He is non-verbal and legally deaf-blind. He went through 6 years of weekly therapy for feeding difficulties, most likely caused by GI disorder. He is self-feeding and eating solid foods now. We’ve started potty training, and we’re finally making progress towards independence and self-help skills! 🙂

A Harvard Medical School analysis of electronic medical records suggests that some children with autism fall into one of three distinct subgroups based on common medical issues.

This post is in response to:Weekly Writing Challenge: Threes | The Daily Post
Continue reading When “Normal” was Normal

A Mile In My Shoes

Well, this morning we got off to a late start. We didn’t have time to practice self-help skills. Every day I like to spend a few extra minutes helping my 7-year-old practice the things he isn’t able to do independently – like dressing himself, climbing the stairs, pulling up and down his pants (as part of potty training), and of course communication skills.

My son, Stephen is completely non-verbal. Part of teaching him to communicate is not anticipating every need.  It takes patience to allow him to express his wants, needs, feelings, and thoughts. Continue reading A Mile In My Shoes

Shameless

I’ve been trying desperately to relax and unwind from a very busy holiday season. This is my son’s 3rd day back to school since Christmas, the house is a mess, I’m behind on chores, I don’t have meals made for my son’s gluten free, restricted egg and dairy diet, I have more work to do than energy…

Continue reading Shameless